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Health  


Weight Gain Is Contagious? And Snacking Fights it?
The Doctor Game – W. Gifford-Jones M.D.
How many people in mid-life can fit into their wedding clothes? Not too many, because predictably, most have exchanged muscle tissue for body fat and more pounds. Now, a report from Johns Hopkins University claims there are proven ways to limit and even reverse weight gain in both sexes.
Women, as they start into menopause along with decreased activity, develop what’s been labelled the “Menopot”. With lowered estrogen, testosterone ... Read More
Drinking Coffee Can Save You from Skin Cancer
By PTI

NEW YORK: Drinking four cups of coffee a day may protect against malignant melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer, a new study has claimed.

Study participants who drank four or more cups of coffee daily were 20 per cent less likely to develop malignant melanoma than non-coffee drinkers, researchers said.

"Our results, ... Read More
Woman on top, doggy style most dangerous sex positions for men
IndiaToday.in
Unbelievable as it may sound, men are likely to suffer fractures during sex as at any other time. The only difference being that the fracture during sex is likely to be a penile fracture.

A new study by scientists, published in Advances in Urology, has found that the 'woman on top' or 'cowgirl' position is the most dangerous for men to engage in during intercourse.

The study found that the 'woman on top' position is ... Read More
German court upholds tenant's right to pee standing up
(Reuters) - A German court ruled in favour of mens' right to pee standing up on Thursday, after a landlord tried to retain part of a tenant's 3,000 euro deposit for allegedly damaging the marble floor of a toilet by sprinkling it with urine.

The debate about whether men should stand or sit is no laughing matter in Germany, where some toilets have red traffic-style signs forbidding the standing position. There is also a derogatory term ... Read More
Is Coconut Oil the Super Food that can Prevent Alzheimer's?
We’re always reading the latest tips on prevention – eat right, reduce stress, get plenty of exercise and keep your brain engaged in challenging activities. As far as diet, coconut oil continues to receive a great deal of attention from advocates like Dr. Mary Newport.

In her 2011 book, “Alzheimer’s Disease: What If There Was a Cure? The Story of Ketones,” Dr. Newport fervently declares that her husband has shown clear improvement in his dementia with ... Read More
4 pharmacy errors that can harm your health
CBC
How often do serious pharmacy errors happen? Actually, nobody knows. There is little data tracking the problem across Canada.

So what do you need to know to stay safe? Here are four errors to watch out for that can have serious consequences for your health.

CBC News and Marketplace have been investigating pharmacy errors for several months in the largest hidden-camera test of its kind in Canada. Follow our continuing coverage at cbcnews.ca. Watch the complete investigation, ... Read More
Life satisfaction improves bone density
Women who are satisfied with their lives have a higher bone density in the golden years, suffering less frequently from osteoporosis than those who are not, according to a new study at the University of Eastern Finland.

Osteoporosis is a disease that can lead to bone fracture due to dwindling density and post-menopausal women are the most at-risk.

Low levels of physical activity and smoking are commonly cited causes leading to osteoporosis, but psychological factors such as ... Read More
Should your kids see you naked?
By Jennifer O'Neill
When my son was a baby, I thought nothing of changing my clothes or bathing in front of him. He’s 4 now and nothing has changed. But recently a laminated sign on the door of the women’s locker room in our local YMCA gave me pause. “With boys age 5 and over,” it read, “please use the Family Changing Area or the men’s locker room.” That got me thinking: Is the clock really ... Read More
Stress can lead to schizophrenia, says study
If you are someone who is constantly stressed, you are at a greater risk of suffering from mental disorders like schizophrenia, says a new study.

Researchers at the Ruhr University Bochum, Germany, revealed in a study that those suff ering from chronic or permanent stress are at a higher risk of mental diseases. Stress results in activation of immune cells that can cause certain changes in the brain, triggering mental disorders like schizophrenia. Under normal circumstances, ... Read More
An avocado a day can keep cholesterol at bay, study suggests
Eating one avocado per day as part of a moderate-fat diet can improve cholesterol levels, according to researchers from the American Heart Association who worked with overweight and obese individuals in a small-scale study.

The research team set out to see what would happen if saturated fatty acids from the typical American diet were replaced with avocados, which contain unsaturated fat.

They put the 45 overweight or obese participants -- who were between the ages of 21 ... Read More
Babies' memory develops while napping: study
Naps during the day of at least a half hour help infants retain new behaviors learned earlier, according to researchers from the University of Sheffield.

"These findings are particularly interesting to both parents and educationalists because they suggest that the optimal time for infants to learn new information is just before they have a sleep," says Dr. Jane Herbert from US's Department of Psychology.

In the study, which is believed to be the first of its kind, ... Read More
8 glasses of water a day 'an urban myth'
The common advice to drink eight glasses of water a day doesn't hold water, say nutrition and kidney specialists who want to dispel the myth.

"What drove us to drink two litres of water a day?" asks an editorial in this week's issue of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.

The recommendation was driven by vested interests rather than health, suggests author Speros Tsindos of the department of dietetics and human nutrition at La ... Read More
Chocolate health myth dissolves
When the New York Times ran this headline last fall, "To improve a memory, consider chocolate," it quickly became one of the newspaper’s "most emailed" stories. Other news outlets rushed to match the story.

My assignment desk perked up and sent me the clipping with the question "interesting?" And it was interesting, but not for the reasons most news editors hope.

It was interesting because the study was not about chocolate at all. That’s because chocolate contains ... Read More
Liver Injury (“DILI”) Is Killing More People Every Year
The Doctor Game – W. Gifford-Jones M.D.

North Americans must rid themselves of a major misconception. Too much Cabernet Sauvignon is not the only way to damage the liver. Today liver injury is being caused by prescription drugs, over-the-counter (OTC) drugs, and some herbal supplements. More than 1,000 drugs and supplements have been associated with drug induced liver injury (DILI) which is increasing every year.
Everything we consume, with both good ... Read More
The Vitamin D Bandwagon: Is it Ahead of the Science?
The Doctor Game – W. Gifford-Jones M.D.
Here are some of the 100 medical conditions that have been associated with decreased blood levels of vitamin D; arthritis, asthma, colon cancer, emphysema, dementia, depression, diabetes, coronary heart disease, fibromyalgia, hypertension, infections, multiple sclerosis, muscle weakness, obesity, Parkinson’s Disease and psoriasis. But how many of these links have been proven by scientific studies?
A report from the University of California says most of them are the result of ... Read More
5 smart fitness tips for working professionals
For a healthy life, all you have to spare is 30 minutes a day.

Read on to find out how simple habits can make a huge difference to your health.

How to stay fitAs an entrepreneur or working professional there is always a sense of panic, stress and meeting deadlines.

Everything around us that is work related takes priority.

We tend to forget that our body and mind is going through immense exhaustion and stress to keep up with ... Read More
Two-thirds of cancers caused by bad luck, not genetics & environment
Plain old bad luck plays a major role in determining who gets cancer and who does not, according to researchers who found that two-thirds of cancer incidence of various types can be blamed on random mutations and not heredity or risky habits like smoking.

The researchers said on Thursday random DNA mutations accumulating in various parts of the body during ordinary cell division are the prime culprits behind many cancer types.

They looked at 31 cancer types ... Read More
Improving child and maternal healthcare in rural areas
Suvali (Surat), Dec 30: Taking a leaf out of Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s pioneering Digital India campaign, HLFPPT has launched an innovative e-ASHA training programme in the remote Suvali block of Surat in the PM’s home state, a fist of its kind initiative that has been shown to improve child and maternal healthcare delivery.

The initiative – an integrated easy-to-use package on Android platform for Tablets, has been developed by UNICEF in partnership with IIT Jodhpur ... Read More
Did You Know You Actually Breathe Out Fat?
NDTV

Did You Know You Actually Breathe Out Fat? There exists a whole lot of information that one can easily access and start following in order to lose weight and become fit. From the kind of physical activity one should indulge in to tailor-made diet plans. Unfortunately, while all of us strive hard to achieve our personal fitness goal every day, very few may have wondered how this process of losing weight actually works. Having ... Read More
An Experiment that should get everyone’s Attention
The Doctor Game _ W. Gifford-Jones M.D.

Why would any sane person drink 10 cokes a day for one month? I recently asked George Prior, a Los Angeles resident and father of two children, this question. His straight-forward answer, “I want to increase the awareness of my children and the public about the dangers of sugar”. But how is Prior proving that all these colas are bad for your health?

His experiment got my attention because I’ve ... Read More
Could foods contain more antioxidants than we thought?
The benefits of certain foods, such as orange juice, could be more important than we think, according to a new study suggesting current methods for determining antioxidant activity only tell half the story.

Researchers from the University of Granada developed a method called the global antioxidant response (GAR) that they claim provides a more thorough analysis because it assesses food in its entirety.

The researchers say that current methods for determining antioxidant value reflect only the portion ... Read More
Pornography, kids and sex education: what to do?
More kids at ever younger ages are accessing pornography online, according to a range of international studies, but there's not much consensus about what, if anything, should be done by parents or teachers to address the issue.

Today in Winnipeg, a children's advocacy group called Beyond Borders will host a symposium entitled "Generation XXX, the pornification of our children."

"The porn industry is the country's main sex educator of our boys and girls," says Cordelia Anderson, one ... Read More
How Skype and email could help seniors avoid loneliness
Researchers say that loneliness is not only emotionally taxing but can affect your life expectancy.

This is of particular concern to seniors, but many have found that modern communications technology provides a means of keeping loneliness at bay.

Just ask 94-year-old Bertha Kronenberg, who lives in Revera’s Forest Hill retirement home in Toronto.

Kronenberg grew up in an orphanage in Johannesburg, and her early life was devoid of love and human contact – staff in the orphanage called ... Read More
On Exchanging body air and body fluids
Ivan Pereira

I recall my son asking me to go with him to a public lecture at Concordia University, Montreal, given by David Suzuki, the famed environmental biologist.

My friend, David Orchard, organic farmer from Alberta, spoke before him.

David said that he was a successful big organic farm owner, and he argued that organic farms could feed the world with good nutrition, and there was no need for genetically modified seeds (GMOs) on our planet. ... Read More
How Much Did You Learn in 2014?
The Doctor Game – W. Gifford-Jones M.D.

Are these questions true or false?

1. If you want to increase the chance of picking up an infection on a plane, ask for an aisle seat.

2. A young woman who carried her cell phone in her bra developed a breast cancer that was the shape of her cell phone.

3. Swedish researchers discovered that when they treated brain tissue of mice suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease with vitamin C, the amyloid ... Read More
Echolocation acts as 'sixth' sense for blind people
A new study by neuroscientists at Western University's Brain and Mind Institute has further demonstrated that human echolocation operates as a viable 'sense,' working in tandem with other senses to deliver information to people with visual impairment.

The findings are published this week in the journal Psychological Science.

"Some blind people use echolocation to assess their environment and find their way around. They will either snap their fingers or click their tongue to bounce sound waves ... Read More
Could foods contain more antioxidants than we thought?
The benefits of certain foods, such as orange juice, could be more important than we think, according to a new study suggesting current methods for determining antioxidant activity only tell half the story.

Researchers from the University of Granada developed a method called the global antioxidant response (GAR) that they claim provides a more thorough analysis because it assesses food in its entirety.

The researchers say that current methods for determining antioxidant value reflect only the portion ... Read More
Pornography, kids and sex education: what to do?
More kids at ever younger ages are accessing pornography online, according to a range of international studies, but there's not much consensus about what, if anything, should be done by parents or teachers to address the issue.

Today in Winnipeg, a children's advocacy group called Beyond Borders will host a symposium entitled "Generation XXX, the pornification of our children."

"The porn industry is the country's main sex educator of our boys and girls," says Cordelia Anderson, one ... Read More
How Skype and email could help seniors avoid loneliness
Researchers say that loneliness is not only emotionally taxing but can affect your life expectancy.

This is of particular concern to seniors, but many have found that modern communications technology provides a means of keeping loneliness at bay.

Just ask 94-year-old Bertha Kronenberg, who lives in Revera’s Forest Hill retirement home in Toronto.

Kronenberg grew up in an orphanage in Johannesburg, and her early life was devoid of love and human contact – staff in the orphanage called ... Read More
On Exchanging body air and body fluids
Ivan Pereira

I recall my son asking me to go with him to a public lecture at Concordia University, Montreal, given by David Suzuki, the famed environmental biologist.

My friend, David Orchard, organic farmer from Alberta, spoke before him.

David said that he was a successful big organic farm owner, and he argued that organic farms could feed the world with good nutrition, and there was no need for genetically modified seeds (GMOs) on our planet. ... Read More
How Much Did You Learn in 2014?
The Doctor Game – W. Gifford-Jones M.D.

Are these questions true or false?

1. If you want to increase the chance of picking up an infection on a plane, ask for an aisle seat.

2. A young woman who carried her cell phone in her bra developed a breast cancer that was the shape of her cell phone.

3. Swedish researchers discovered that when they treated brain tissue of mice suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease with vitamin C, the amyloid ... Read More
Echolocation acts as 'sixth' sense for blind people
A new study by neuroscientists at Western University's Brain and Mind Institute has further demonstrated that human echolocation operates as a viable 'sense,' working in tandem with other senses to deliver information to people with visual impairment.

The findings are published this week in the journal Psychological Science.

"Some blind people use echolocation to assess their environment and find their way around. They will either snap their fingers or click their tongue to bounce sound waves ... Read More
Turmeric therapy to fight malaria
New Delhi, Dec. 17: Indian scientists have trapped a key ingredient of the common kitchen spice turmeric in tiny spheres shaped like soap bubbles and are pitching the entrapped molecule as a potential new therapy to fight malaria.

Aparajita Ghosh at the Bose Institute, Calcutta, and her colleagues have shown that the turmeric compound called curcumin, entrapped in spheres, can improve survival in mice infected with a parasite similar to the one that causes brain inflammation ... Read More
Women with dense breasts face dilemma of screening options beyond mammograms
Lauran Neergaard

WASHINGTON -- More women are learning their breasts are so dense that it's more difficult for mammograms to spot cancer. But new research suggests automatically giving them an extra test isn't necessarily the solution.

Screening isn't the only concern. Women whose breast tissue is very dense have a greater risk of developing breast cancer than women whose breasts contain more fatty tissue.

Laws in 19 states require women to be told if they have dense breasts ... Read More
How old do you feel? The answer might help predict your death, study suggests
CHICAGO -- How old do you feel? Think carefully -- the answer might help predict how much longer you'll live. That's according to British research posing that question to about 6,500 adults. Those who felt younger than their real age lived the longest over the following eight years.

Here are five key findings from the study, by researchers Isla Rippon and Andrew Steptoe at University College London. Results were published online Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine:

REAL ... Read More
Active sitting: What it can (and can't) do for you
As studies emerge classifying sitting for extended periods as bad to our health, wobbly stools and exercise balls are replacing office chairs, pedal sets are being installed under desks and everyone's talking about how to stay physically active while seated at their desk.

But what can we expect from active sitting? L.A.-based trainer and martial arts expert Philippe Til weighs in on the facts and fables.

Fact: Effective posture is the basis for active sitting, so if ... Read More
Low-glycemic diet may not benefit heart health
Diets that classify high-carb foods by how much they increase blood sugar don't improve risk factors for diabetes or cardiovascular disease as previously thought, according to a new study.

"The study results were very surprising," says lead author Frank M. Sacks, MD, a physician and researcher in Brigham and Women's Hospital's Channing Division of Network Medicine. "Our findings demonstrated that using glycemic index to select specific foods did not improve LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood ... Read More
Expert Says, “It’s The Worst Dirty Trick of Aging”
The Doctor Game- Gifford-Jones

In 2014, how much progress did we make in the search for sound lifestyle? Many of us know it’s better to ask for low fat milk or eat more chicken than fatty meat. Some of us see the nutritional folly of soft drinks loaded with sugar, and that we should eat more fruits and vegetables. But a report in Nutrition Action Health Letter says some messages have not shown up on our ... Read More
Canadian Arrhythmia Network to be hosted at Western University
The Government of Canada announced $26.3 million in funding today to establish the Canadian Arrhythmia Network (CANet) as a Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) hosted at Western University’s Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry.

This announcement positions Western and London as the national centre for research into the effective diagnosis and treatment of heart rhythm disturbances, also known as arrhythmias, such as syncope, atrial fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Sudden cardiac death alone accounts ... Read More
Thalassaemia on the blind spot? Call to improve prevention, treatment and care
Shobha Shukla, Citizen News Service

(CNS): "It is not only about preventing new births of thalassemic infants; about chelation, about blood transfusion and about availability of services needed; but also about preventing complications related to Thalassaemia. We cannot take half baked measures. Because if the patient dies prematurely, it will be a huge waste of national resources—10-15 years worth of investment just goes down the drain. Inadequate chelation and blood transfusion can result in hospitalization ... Read More
Believe it or snot: nasal mucus vital to maintaining health
TORONTO -- It's icky and messy and sometimes it clogs your airways, making you feel like you can't breathe. Heck, even its name is repugnant.

We're talking about snot here.

Yeah, gross topic. But with cold and flu season looming, snot -- or nasal mucus, as it can be more delicately described -- is something many of us will experience first hand in the not-too-distant future.

Here are some things you may not know about this decidedly disgusting ... Read More
New research from Brain and Mind Institute able to grasp what can't be seen
Cognitive neuroscientists at Western University have proved that people have an unconscious ability to control and even manipulate objects without knowledge of size or space. The findings, published this week in Psychological Science, show humans have an innate capacity for reaching out and grasping objects accurately from a cluttered environment – like a refrigerator or a desk – without properly perceiving the size of the intended objects.

The researchers from Western's world renowned Brain and Mind ... Read More
Stop water privatisation and strengthen public water supply
Citizen News Service
A new report by Corporate Accountability International uncovers how the World Bank uses ponzi-style marketing tactics to sell privatization projects around the globe that it is also positioned to profit from. "Water privatization has been a disaster,” said Dr Sandeep Pandey, Magsaysay Awardee and national vice president of Socialist Party (India). "We must prevent the World Bank and corporations like Veolia from expanding their reach and block any potential project."

In response to ... Read More
Over-the-Counter Cancer Fighters
By Dr. Brian Goldman

This year, The Canadian Cancer Society estimates that more than 190-thousand Canadians will be diagnosed with cancer. Seventy-six thousand will die of it.

Now researchers are looking at the efficacy of over-the-counter remedies as cancer fighters.

One of the drugs they are looking at is cimetidine, once a prescription drug sold under the brand name Tagamet. For years, cimetidine has been an over-the-counter drug treatment for peptic ulcer disease and for indigestion. ... Read More
Take a Look Before You Flush the Toilet
The Doctor Game – W. Gifford-Jones M.D.
Readers tell me they often discuss my column at dinner parties. But at this festive time of year I doubt that will happen with this column. Today, it’s Course 101 on Poop. So, why would you want to look into the toilet before flushing it? It could save your life. But it might also scare you half-to-death.
A look into the bowl after a bowel movement has ... Read More
Week-long World AIDS Day programmes conclude
•Leading health NGO facilitates world record attempt for biggest mosaic of condom packets at IIM Lucknow
New Delhi, Dec 9: A world record attempt at creating the biggest mosaic of condom packets, screening of couples for HIV/AIDS and mass awareness campaigns were among a raft of programmes organised by HLFPPT across six states as the week-long events related to World AIDS Day drew to a close with a clarion call for safe sex.
As a precursor ... Read More
‘Superbugs’ Kill India’s Babies and Pose an Overseas Threat
By GARDINER HARRISDEC. 3, 2014
AMRAVATI, India — A deadly epidemic that could have global implications is quietly sweeping India, and among its many victims are tens of thousands of newborns dying because once-miraculous cures no longer work.
... Read More
Punjab to mark World AIDS Day
Amritsar, November 30: As part of the global efforts to fight HIV/AIDS, healthcare charity Hindustan Latex Family Planning Promotion Trust (HLFPPT) is organising a slew of events across Punjab to mark World AIDS Day on December 1.
Around 200 participants including professionals, social workers and experts associated with various HIV/AIDS control programmes will take out a candle light march in Amritsar at 5pm on Monday from the Guru Nanak Hospital to Kacheri Chowk covering different ... Read More
Heroin for Addicts? Or Send Them to Northern Canada?
The Doctor Game – W. Gifford-Jones M.D.
How would I react if I were dying of terminal cancer and none of the current painkillers could ease my agony? Or if I were suffering day after day the pain of crippling arthritis and no medication relieved my misery? And then I read that addicts were granted prescription heroin to treat their addiction. I’d be damn annoyed that this painkiller was available for addicts but not ... Read More
Breaking taboos, reaping dividends
Swapna Majumdar, Citizen News Service
Consider these statistics: Globally, 370,000 million children are married every day. By 2020, an additional 142 million girls will be married before their 18th birthday. 6 million adolescent pregnancies occur in South Asia-- 90% of them inside marriage. Further, 34% of all unsafe abortions in the Asia Pacific region happen to women below the age of 25.

Yet, talking about sexual and reproductive health (SRH) still remains a taboo. The ... Read More
New Brain and Mind study provides better understanding in dementia
A new study from Western University provides researchers and clinicians with insight into a particularly debilitating memory problem that is present in some patients suffering from neurodegeneration caused by Lewy body dementia or Alzheimer's disease.

This disorder, known as Capgras Syndrome (or sometimes Misidentification Syndrome), is characterized by the delusional belief that a person with whom the patient shares a close emotional bond, typically the spouse, has been replaced by an imposter or look-alike.

In ... Read More
Carbs more harmful than saturated fats: study
(WASHINGTON-AFP) - Long-derided saturated fats -- associated with an array of health problems such as heart disease -- caught a break Friday when research revealed their intake could be doubled or even nearly tripled without driving up their level in a person's blood.

Carbohydrates, meanwhile, are associated with heightened levels of a fatty acid linked to increased risk for diabetes and heart disease, the same study showed.

"The point is you don't necessarily save the saturated fat ... Read More
U.S. researchers discover 'pre-cancers' in blood
Many older people silently harbour a blood "pre-cancer" -- a gene mutation acquired during their lifetime that could start them on the path to leukemia, lymphoma or other blood disease, scientists have discovered. It opens a new frontier on early detection and possibly someday preventing these cancers, which become more common with age.

The discovery was made by two international research teams working independently, decoding the DNA of about 30,000 people.

The gene mutations were rare in ... Read More
Identical twins' differences focus of epigenetics studies
Researchers are focusing on the differences between identical twins, rather than the similarities, in an attempt to rethink the nature versus nurture debate, and unlock medical mysteries including cancer.

Researcher Tim Spector of King's College, London, studies twins in the U.K. to learn what their differences can teach us.

"Unlike the press stories that show twins often die within a few months or each other, or a few hours ... they're often dying years apart of completely ... Read More
Sugar is the same, nutritionally, even by any other name
Consumers who think brown sugar is healthier than white sugar, that the large-grained demerara sugar is healthier than brown sugar, or that honey is better than any of them, think again — nutritionally, they're all basically the same, according to some experts.

"The short answer is no," said Kate Comeau, a Halifax-based dietitian and spokeswoman with Dietitians of Canada, when asked if there are any differences.
Michigan Daily Life

Sugar is back in the headlines, this time ... Read More
How shovelling snow can 'shock' your heart
There's something gentle and peaceful about a snowfall — that is, until it comes to shovelling the stuff, at which point it can become deadly.

The latest evidence of this is the recent storm in the northern U.S., which has led to eight deaths, several of which can be attributed to heart attacks sustained while shovelling snow, officials say.

Digging yourself out after a large snowfall can be "a shock to the system," says Matthew Mayer, a ... Read More
Sewa and Vyasa concluded 4th camp to manage Diabetes through Yoga
The 20 hour program to manage Diabetes through Yoga therapy was conducted in partnership with City of Houston Health department. This was 4th such camps offered by Sewa International and VYASA in Houston. Fifteen residents of third ward area participated in this camp which was spread over 3 weekends.

Melanie Gilmore, (Health Planning Chief with Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS), Division of Aging, Chronic Disease and Injury Prevention (ACDIP), expressed great joy and ... Read More
Vegetarians maybe healthy but not happy
Source : ANI
A new study has found that though people on veggie diet maybe healthier than meat-eaters, they are not generally happier.

According to the Alere Wellness Index, vegetarians tend to drink and smoke less and are physically more active than non-vegetarians, but they are also more likely to have mental problems like depression and anxiety disorders.

Dr John Lang, who developed the wellness index made up of scores for nutrition, fitness, smoking, alcohol, psychological wellbeing, body ... Read More
Mega condom-mosaic boosts HIV/AIDS awareness
Guinness World Record attempt at IIM-L is a clarion call for safe sex
New Delhi, Nov 24: The Hindustan Latex Family Planning Promotion Trust (HLFPPT) has spearheaded a novel effort to spread awareness among youth about HIV/AIDS and safe sex by playing a key role in facilitating a world record attempt for the biggest mosaic of condom packets.
HLFPPT organised the off-beat event recently in association with the UPSACS (Uttar Pradesh State AIDS Control Society) at ... Read More



Journal of Comparative Family Studies   

The leading journal exclusively specializing in cross-cultural family studies.

The Journal of Comparative Family Studies was established in 1970 to publish high quality articles based on research in cross cultural family studies.  The journal promotes a better understanding of inter-ethnic family interaction that is essential for all multicultural societies.  It draws articles from social science researchers around the world and contains invaluable material for Sociologists, Anthropologists, Family counselors and Social Psychologists.

- Editor:  DGeorge Kurian

Titles of some special issues:

  • Comparative perspectives on black family life (1998)
  • Families' and children's inequalities (2003)
  • The transmission of religious beliefs across generations: do grandparents matter? (2008)


The journal is published five times a year including special issues on selected themes. The Journal is available online to institutional subscribers. Yearly Subscriptions available for individuals or institutions, contact information below:



Journal of Comparative Family Studies
Department of Sociology, University of Calgary
2500 University Drive N.W.
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 Canada
Email: jcfs@ucalgary.ca

  • The Arab family (1997)
  • Ethnicity and gender in non-traditional family forms: studies of families pushing   normative boundaries (2000)
  • Immigrant and ethnic minority families (2001)
  • Theoretical and methodological issues in cross-cultural families (2002)
  • Violence against women in the family (2003)
  • Turbulent times and family life in the contemporary Middle East (2004)
  • Farm family responses to changing agricultural conditions: The actors' point of view (2005)
  • Intergenerative conflicts and health hazards in migrant families (2006)
  • Informal unions in Mexico and the United States (2007)
  • Homemaker or career woman: life course factors and racial influences among middle class Americans (2008)
  • HIV and AIDS: are all women equally at risk? Afrikaans speaking married women's perceptions of self-risk (2008)




 
 
 
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